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Patient Engagement Tip of the Month

Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MAGeri Lynn Baumblatt MA, For the last 20 years, Geri has worked to help people understand health conditions and procedures, orient them to their diagnoses, make more informed decisions about their care, and partner with their care teams.  She oversaw the creation of the Emmi program library, and she regularly speaks and serves on patient engagement, patient experience, health literacy, shared decision making, health design, family caregiving, and heath communication panels for organizations like AHRQ, the Brookings Institute, Stanford Medicine X, and the Center for Plain Language. She serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Patient Experience, is on the board of the Society for Participatory Medicine, and published a chapter in Transformative Healthcare Practice through Patient Engagement (IGI Global). She currently consults on patient engagement, family caregiving, and health communication. Follow her on Twitter @GeriLynn

Showing all Blog Posts with tag: doctor's appointment View All Blog Posts
Posted: Friday, January 30, 2015

When Patients Befriend Dr. Google

Co-author: Kerry O’Connell, a construction executive from Denver, CO
For mKerry O'Connellany patients, the Internet becomes their best friend. They spend evenings searching for cures for damaged nerves. When Kerry O’Connell fell off a ladder and destroyed his arm, and when surgeries and treatments failed and made his pain and function even worse, he went, as most of us do, to look for answers online.
When showing this online research to his physician, he was advised to be careful as much of that info was not reliable. Fair warning, but when people are searching for answers and trying to collaborate in their care, they’re often dismissed and made to feel like they overstepped.
Kerry found out he could access medical journals from the med school library. For his next visit he came armed not with flimsy Google search results, but real studies. His doctor was not impressed, saying even studies from last year were out of date and nowhere near the current state of the medical art.

People are searching for a reason

It’s often a sign they feel uneasy and don’t have the answers they need. It’s also an opportunity to find out what those are. In Kerry’s case, he was looking for alternatives to more surgery, drug side effects, better descriptions of typical outcomes, and empathy from others who had gone through the same thing.
Anytime we can provide patient-friendly resources that proactively answer these questions, it can help keep people from going down those online rabbit holes.
But people can also find meaningful information. Sometimes it’s the empathy and support from connecting with others. Other times, people like Dave deBronkart can find out about a medical treatment for his rare cancer by talking to an online patient forum. A treatment his physicians didn’t know about at the time.
As patients and families increasingly turn to online resources, how do you help them find the good ones? And how do you work with them?

Kerry O’Connell is a construction executive from Denver, Colorado, who builds infrastructure by day and lobbies the healthcare industry by night. His favorite causes include infection prevention, medical device training and creating a post-harm standard of care. His articles have appeared in places like Health Affairs, and he regularly provides the patient perspective at conferences like the Summer Institute for Informed Patient Choice.

Tags: patient engagement, doctor's appointment, personal healthcare
Posted: Friday, September 20, 2013

Be Psychic

That’s right, when telling people about a procedure or a new diagnosis, it helps to be a little bit psychic. To be fair, you don’t actually have to be psychic, so much as seem psychic.

You probably already know the questions, fears and worries patients have around certain procedures or diagnoses: When is it okay to have sex again? Will my scar be noticeable? When can I drive again?

These questions weigh on people’s minds. And it may even be hard for them to concentrate on anything else you say until they get an answer. Sometimes they feel embarrassed to ask because they have a question about something like ED or depression medication, other times they’re embarrassed that what they’re worried about is something cosmetic, like a scar. Or it’s the real day-to-day concerns about being able to care for their family.

So, if they don’t bring it up themselves, normalize those questions with a simple "now with this procedure, a lot of people ask…" It’s amazing the relief they feel to know they’re not the only ones with this question and that they didn’t have to be the one to bring it up.

Tags: patient engagement, communication, doctor's appointment