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Patient Engagement Tip of the Month

Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MAGeri Lynn Baumblatt, MA, is the Executive Director of Patient Engagement at Emmi where she oversees the creation of multimedia patient engagement, education, shared decision-making, and behavior change Emmi programs and interactive phone calls. She hosts an annual October Health Literacy Month blog series for Engaging the Patient. She regularly speaks and serves on health literacy and shared decision making panels for organizations like AHRQ, the Institute for Healthcare Advancement, Health Literacy Missouri, and the Center for Plain Language. She also serves as an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Patient Experience. Emmi Solutions works with decision scientists, behavior change experts, patients, and clinicians; they draw on their research and experience to create content that helps patients engage in their care.


Showing all Blog Posts with tag: patient education View All Blog Posts
Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017

Empowering Patients with a Common Language

By Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MA, Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi
 








Just one week after her 29th birthday Liz Salmi suffered a grand mal seizure and was
rushed to the ER. A CT scan of her brain showed a large mass, and after a nine-hour brain surgery she was diagnosed with a gemistocytic astrocytoma -- a slow growing, but malignant brain tumor with a high rate of recurrence.
 
And recur it did. 

Six months after Salmi’s first surgery her tumor grew back sending her into a whirlwind of treatments over the next two years, including a second brain surgery, struggles with seizures, a rigorous schedule of physical and occupational therapy, and 24 months of chemotherapy.
 
Fortunately, Salmi received excellent care through her neuro-oncology nurse practitioner.


 
“I used to refer to her as ‘Super Awesome Nurse’ because she handled my nausea, headaches, and constipation -- all the side effects of treatment,” remembered Salmi. “She would field my daily calls and emails, tweaking and adjusting medications or suggesting simple life hacks to help me through what I was feeling.”
 
But Salmi never knew the kind of care she was receiving had a name until five years after she completed treatment and started working for a healthcare nonprofit advocating for access to palliative care for all people facing serious illness.
 
“After I took the job it took a few months for me to realize I am a person who received palliative care,” said Salmi. “At the time, I assumed the care was the result of me being lucky enough to have been paired with an amazing NP (which could still be true); but now I know the name for it is palliative care.”
 
Why did Super Awesome Nurse never tell Liz she was receiving palliative care? We asked her!
 
“While I, as the healthcare provider, may have viewed much of the care that was being rendered as palliative in nature, not all patients are ready or willing to consider that most types of brain tumor care is palliative,” said Mady Stovall, NP, former neuro-oncology nurse practitioner and current PhD student at Oregon Health and Science University.
Avoiding the term “palliative” initially is understandable. After all, there’s a lot of confusion between palliative care and hospice. And no one wants to cause panic that a condition is more serious or has suddenly become more serious.
 
“The perception in cancer care is that palliative care is often (and inappropriately) equated with hospice care,” explained Stovall. “Sadly, this misconception prevents many patients, families, and even healthcare providers from being able to capitalize on the expertise and resources of palliative care providers and programs. “
 
However, if Salmi had changed health systems or had to find a new provider, she would not have had the words to translate the care provided by this “super awesome” nurse to make sure it continued or was re-initiated as needed. She didn’t have the language to ask for that care and advocate for herself.
 
“Having coordinated palliative care was crucial to my quality of life because my brain tumor was causing a lot of seizure activity,” explained Salmi. “I tried seven different anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) over five years to finally land at the right combination of medication that worked for me. Seizures are scary and make you feel as if you don’t have control over your own body. That’s why palliative care is essential; these providers listen to your concerns and fears and make sure your medical as well as emotional needs are addressed.”

Giving People Language for Self-Advocacy
While we shouldn’t overwhelm patients with clinical language, helping them understand what things like palliative care ARE and ARE NOT improves their ability to advocate for themselves.
In fact, it was only after her recurrence that Salmi learned about oncology social workers. Had she known about this role, she would have asked for it when going through surgery and treatment for her initial tumor.
Not everyone is going to become an expert patient in health communications, but educating patients and families as they get and make decisions about care can help them tell us what is most important to them.

*As an additional note we are proud to announce that Liz and Geri will be part of a panel at Stanford Medicine X on advance care planning. Joining them will be palliative physician Dr. Michael Fratkin, researcher Rebecca Sudore, and MD/JD: Dr. Aretha Delight Davis.  

Liz Salmi is a curious person-turned citizen scientist who turned her brain cancer diagnosis into an open source chronicle of the patient experience. Today, her blog TheLizArmy.com receives over than 30,000 visits each year. Her interests include patient-driven research, the quantified self, open source health data, and neuroscience. When she's not blogging, Liz is a patient advocate for OpenNotes on national movement that encourages health care professionals to share the notes they write with the patients they care for, with the goal of improving the quality and safety of care. @TheLizArmy

Tags: patient engagement, personal healthcare, empathy, health literacy, patient education, engagement, experience, healthcare, listening
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Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2016

The Expectation/Experience Gap

By Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MA, Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi

Co-author: Carly Thanhouser

Even though clinicians have great insights, if they haven’t gone through it, there’s only a partial understanding of the lived realities. Interestingly, as patients become more and more active in their care, they have higher expectations of the care that they will receive.  >>>


Tags: patient engagement, empathy, patient education, expectations
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Posted: Saturday, October 29, 2016

Highlights from the "Clarity is Power!" Health Literacy Month Series

By Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MA, Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi
The end goal of health literacy is to empower patients, families, communities and clinicians with clarity and confidence to engage in care. Here are just a few highlights from the Clarity is Power series. 
See more great articles from the 2016 Health Literacy Month Series.
 


Tags: shared decision making, family caregiver, health literacy, patient education
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Posted: Friday, September 30, 2016

A Clear Path to Better Recovery

By Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MA, Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi

By Emily Azari with Dr. Elizabeth Wick

This article is a preview of Emmi's 7th Annual Health Literacy Blog Series: Clarity is Power! Clarity and effective patient communication isn’t about “getting patients to follow through.” Rather, it’s about fostering a partnership with the patient.  >>>

 


Tags: patient engagement, health literacy, pain management, patient education
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