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Don't Forget "The Why"

Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Geri Lynn Baumblatt, M.A., Editorial Director at Emmi Solutions I don’t know about you, but I don’t tend to blindly do things just because someone tells me to. Yet we expect patients to do this all the time -- and when they don’t we brand them “non-adherent.” We all have that inner 3-year old that just wants to know “why.” But more than curiosity, we need to make sense of the information.

And when we don’t give people “the why,” or assume they already know why, they will fill in the blank on their own. Take this real example: a bariatric patient is told not to eat or drink 8 hours before his surgery. No reason. Just do it. He shows up having had breakfast. When asked why he didn’t follow instructions, he says “Oh, I thought my doctor just wanted me to start dieting.”

This person is not stupid, he was just trying to make sense of seemingly meaningless orders. A story closer to home: a friend of mine didn’t heed instructions not to smoke in the days after oral surgery. Only after a dry socket developed did the oral surgeon explain that smoking both affects healing and that any kind of sucking action, including cigarettes, and not just through straws, can dislodge the blood clot. Once back home and in pain she said, “Well, if I had known that, I wouldn’t have smoked.”

Tags: communication
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