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Strategies to Help Patients Make Medical Decisions

Monday, June 23, 2014
Geri Lynn Baumblatt, M.A., Editorial Director at Emmi Solutions Medical decisions are daunting. Just walking people through their treatment options can be time-consuming. But how can we help people think about their preferences and life and make a decision that's right for them?

One approach is providing people with videos or written stories (narratives) of what others chose. After all, stories are more engaging and compelling than throwing a lot of numbers and information at people, but do they help people make good decisions? Researchers continue to take a closer look at the effects of narratives, and unfortunately they seem to cause different types of biases and issues. The issue with narratives may be that they are so compelling. (To read more about recent research on patient narratives visit http://engagingthepatient.com/2014/06/25/patient-narratives-shared-medical-decisions/)

Another approach is to help people "try a decision on." For example, instead of simply asking a woman with breast cancer how she feels about breast reconstruction or a prosthetic, ask her to think through different situations, like how she would feel putting on a favorite dress, changing in a locker room, or wearing a bathing suit. This type of thought exercise may help people get a sense of their own narrative without feeling the emotional tug of someone else's story.

Clearly, we need more research to know what we can do to help people apply their preferences to the often complex matrixes of treatment options, side effects, and treatment burdens. What have you tried in your practice to help people integrate their personal preferences into their decisions?

Tags: patient engagement, communication, shared decision making
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