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The Case of the Unfilled Rx

Monday, February 24, 2014
With medical ads on TV some people go to doctor's asking for a medication they’re sure will cure what ails them. But more often, when a new medication is being prescribed, people are dubious. And they’re not likely to express it aloud. Do they really need it? Maybe their uncle took statins and now has leg pain – a valid point informed by real-life experience. Other times people may feel stigmatized if they need to take a second medication for something like diabetes, and if it’s an injectable, fear of needles is enough for many people to silently decide “no.”

So many reasons to avoid taking a drug, and yet we often assume people are simply non-adherent. But maybe we never made sure they agreed to take it in the first place.

People definitely need to understand what the medication is for and why their doctor thinks they should take it. But if we don’t ask patients about their goals and preferences, we can’t know if they do or don’t want it, or if another medication or treatment might be a better option for their lifestyle. But there’s no way to know without asking. We can’t expect people to feel comfortable volunteering this information. And without inviting patients to share their concerns and preferences, they may just nod, politely put the prescription in their bag, and walk right past the pharmacy.


Tags: patient engagement, communication
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