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Time to Give Up the Car Keys?

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Engaging Patients & Families in Conversations about Aging & Driving

Nate O'Keefe
Co-author Nate O’Keefe (featured left) is the co-founder and CEO of Roobrik, a Durham, NC-based startup that builds online tools designed to help older adults and their families make informed care decisions. Nate has spent more than 10 years with companies including Modality, Epocrates, and AthenaHealth creating products that deliver high stakes health and care information to clinicians, students, patients, and family caregivers.


When families of aging parents ask clinicians and caregivers: “Should mom keep driving?” you know it’s a loaded question. You may feel like you’re being asked to be the bad cop. How do you make recommendations that minimize risk for your patient and other drivers and pedestrians?  How do you help families think through the trade-offs between safety and independence?
 
It can be even more difficult to broach the subject when health conditions arise that make driving riskier and you’re NOT asked about it. For most of us, driving was our first real taste of independence and it defines our ability to be productive, social, and engaged in society.  How do you steer someone down the path of cutting back or stopping while helping them understand there are alternatives (and even benefits) to giving up the keys?
 
For those of you who don’t talk with families about driving as part of your routines, or who still struggle with difficult situations, we offer three resources:
 
  1. Your clinical peers
For many patients, an office visit is not sufficient to fully evaluate driving ability, and without an accurate picture of ability, you risk having your patient either stop before they need to or continue for too long. Here’s where an occupational therapist can be your best friend. In a standalone practice or as part of a driving clinic, OTs can do functional clinical and road testing to assess ability and recommend modifications to make driving safer. Find an OT-CDRS.
 
  1. Best practices
In 2010, the AMA and NHTSA collaborated to produce the Physician's’ Guide to Assessing and Counseling Older Drivers. This free publication is extremely comprehensive and highly practical, covering assessment, rehab, medical conditions, state laws, and much more, with frequent sample scripts to use for difficult situations and conversations.
 
  1. Tools to engage patients & families
    This issue often marks the transition from doctor-patient to a doctor-patient-caregiver relationship. All of the sudden, you’re not just engaging directly with the patient but also their concerned family. After all, the family is often responsible for carrying out the decision and supporting the patient through this transition. In addition to traditional resources like the AARP, free interactive tools to assess driving ability like the one developed by Roobrik can help families assess the situation and make a plan for limiting or stopping driving.
 
Remember, this issue if often the beginning of an important transition. Driving safety presents an opportunity to start a dialogue about changing needs and to put a process in place that encourages open communication around not just health and wellness issues, but the care issues that will begin to define this new phase of life.
 
 
October is Health Literacy Month on EngagingThePatient

Hear from patients, family caregivers, clinicians, health literacy researchers, patient educators and others about the intersection of health literacy and transitions every weekday in October. Visit engagingthepatient.com to read the articles or to subscribe to the blog.
 
 
 

Tags: patient engagement, communication, family caregiver
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